Senior Isaias Alvarado Transitions from Soccer to Rugby

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rugbyAs senior Isaias Alvarado sprints down the field during another practice drill, he carries the rugby ball, ignoring every soccer instinct to kick the ball. With his face gleaming with sweat, he uses his intense speed to maneuver around his opponents. He swiftly passes the ball behind him to one of his teammates, who quickly runs down the field and successfully scores. Glowing with confidence, Isaias realizes he is finally getting the hang of this new sport.

“When I heard about the rugby team I was interested but it seemed so confusing, but with lots of practice I eventually began to understand and enjoy it,” Alvarado said.

Alvarado was rightfully confused; the similarities between soccer and rugby are quite extensive. However, there are some major differences. In rugby you’re able to use your hands to pass and progress the ball up the field. Many players have also attested that it is far more aggressive.

Coach Trevor Locke has years of rugby experience with both playing and coaching. He is very determined to turn all of his players into “total athletes”. He is training them to be coordinated in all aspects, such as their hands, feet and mindsets. He strongly believes Alvarado is close to this achievement. With Alvarado’s 12 years of soccer experience, he is able to coordinate his speed and feet with the game. His only challenge is learning to play with his hands.

“I’m so proud of the way Isaias has really connected with the team,” Coach Locke said. “His talent really shows on the field when he works with other players.”

Although Alvarado loves rugby, soccer is his main passion. He still plays on his club team and plans on pursuing college soccer. Although his future may not include rugby, he is working and playing hard for his first and last season.

“We are so proud of him, he’s so talented and skilled in both sports and we will support him no matter what he chooses to continue playing,” Alvarado’s father, Ricardo Alvarado said.

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