Sophomore Addy Bradbury Rides Horses at Girl Scout Camp

Sophomore+Addy+Bradbury+poses+with+her+horse+in+the+stables.+She+started+riding+horses+when+she+was+in+first+grade.++%28photo+submitted%29
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Sophomore Addy Bradbury Rides Horses at Girl Scout Camp

Sophomore Addy Bradbury poses with her horse in the stables. She started riding horses when she was in first grade.  (photo submitted)

Sophomore Addy Bradbury poses with her horse in the stables. She started riding horses when she was in first grade. (photo submitted)

Sophomore Addy Bradbury poses with her horse in the stables. She started riding horses when she was in first grade. (photo submitted)

Sophomore Addy Bradbury poses with her horse in the stables. She started riding horses when she was in first grade. (photo submitted)

By Abagayle Johnson and Kaili Martin

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Sophomore Addy Bradbury started riding horses when she was in first grade. She rode first when she was around eight years old at a Girl Scout camp. At this camp, she fell in love with riding horses as soon as she began. Bradbury’s troop rents the horses from a woman who owns the horses on a farm. Bradbury is then able to ride horses every summer as her girl scout troop rents them from her.

“I like learning new things: from riding and being able to trot, and learning new tricks and feeling accomplished,” Bradbury said.

She still goes to a riding camp at Camp Cedar Ledge. At this camp, there is a horse riding program. They even have competitions at the end of the two week camp.  To prepare for this competition, Bradbury gets two weeks of arena time with other girls and horses. She said she doesn’t get the same horse every year because of the level of the person and the horse don’t always match up. Before riding, she has to get her equipment ready, including a saddle and bridle, and then she gets mounted up on her horse to ride.

“The last two years, I’ve been a whipped wrangler in training, and next year I will get to stay for four weeks to become a advanced wrangler in training called “A-whip,” Bradbury said.

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